Rights Instinct And Big Government

Through tradition we are conditioned to except certain erroneous ideas as facts. Example from the Declaration of independence: People’s are “Endowed by their creator with certain inalienable rights,” In the first system our creator gave the world, ordinary people had no rights at all. Kings and some other leaders were assumed to possess divine rights but that was it. Individual rights are a concept that was evolved into. For many thousands of years, common people served a master like a king or chief.

At the time of the American Revolution, the colonists were in a unique set of circumstances. In Europe intellectuals were entertaining the idea of individual rights for a number of years. The colonists were separated from England by a great distance, adventurous by nature and detached to a certain degree from the king’s authority. A confluence of unlikely events and circumstances gave them the mentality to try a new form of government based on individual rights.

As great as individual right are, people are still instinctively predisposed to live under and serve a master. Further, they are instinctively predisposed to look to a master to provide security and solve problems collectively. Over years, people have empowered government not because of some kind of intellectual wisdom but because of instinctive impulses they cannot resist. When commentators go on television and talk about government creating jobs and making the economy better, this is not an exercise in intellect. It is instinctive to assume government can do these things. Any serious investigation of the facts shows that collective actions such as these work against the best interests of society and individuals. Instinctive actions are so natural, that people do not realize they are not thinking.

The discipline of economics assumes that individuals make decisions by free will. On occasion they do when acting as individuals in the market place. When participating in collective decision making people act mostly out instinct and usually without thinking at all. The phenomenon of individuals having economic freedom is an evolutionary advancement. Unfortunately individuals are instinctively driven to give government roles that are destructive to their interests.

A certain segment of the population sees the wisdom of having and maintaining a free market economic system. The free market characteristics of our economic system are solely responsible for our high standard of living. The fact that the market system is still operating is a miracle given that people are driven by instinct to destroy it and return to the old system where everyone serves the government.

Mainstream economists assume that decisions are made through intellect when in fact a great number are instinctively driven. When an economic model fails or a forecast is inaccurate, chances are one or more basic assumptions are erroneous.

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About Fantasy Free Economics

James Quillian independent scholar,free market economist,and teacher of natural law. Who is James Quillian? Certainly I am nobody special, Just a tireless academic and deep thinker. Besides that, I have broken the code with respect to economics and political science. Credentials? Nothing you would be impressed with. I am not a household name. It is hard to become famous writing that virtually no one in the country is genuinely not in touch with reality. But, if I did not do that, there would be no point in my broking the broken the code. If you read the blog, it is easy to see that there are just a few charts, no math and no quantitative analysis. That is not by accident. Given what I know, those items are completely useless. I do turn out to be highly adept at applying natural law. Natural law has predominance over any principles the social science comes up. By virtue of understanding natural law, I can debunk, in just a few sentences , any theory that calls for intervention by a government. My taking the time to understand the ins and outs of Keynes General Theory is about like expecting a chemistry student to completely grasp all that the alchemists of the middle ages thought they understood in efforts to turn base metals into goal. Keynesian theory clearly calls for complete objectivity. Government can only make political decisions. Keynesian techniques call for economic decisions. So, why go any further with that? Fantasy Free Economics is in a sense a lot like technical analysis. Technical analysis began with the premise that it was impossible to gain enough information studying fundamentals to gain a trading advantage. Study the behavior of investors instead. Unlike technical analysis, I don't use technical charts. What I understand are the incentives of different people and entities active in the economics arena. For example, there is no such thing as an incentive to serve with life in the aggregate. In the aggregate, only self interest applies. It is routinely assumed otherwise. That is highly unappealing. But, I am sorry. That is the way it is. I can accept that because I am genuinely in touch with reality. Step one in using Fantasy Free Economics is for me to understand just how little I really know. A highly credentialed economist may know 100 times what I do based on the standard dogma. Compare the knowledge each of us has compared to all there is to know and we both look like we know nothing at all. There is always more than we don't know than what we do know. I am humble enough to present myself on that basis. Why? That is the way it is. I am not bad at math. I have taught math. What I understand is when to use it and when to rely on something else. Math is useless in natural law so I don't use it. While others look at numbers, I am busy understanding the forces in nature that makes their numbers what they are. That gives me a clear advantage.
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