The Imaginary Incentive to Serve

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The world we live in is governed by the laws of dominance and subservience. There is no way to escape the system until our tenure here is complete.

Most people are unwilling to entertain the idea that most of what we do in aggregations of people is instinctive and that we have inborn propensities that are always present. `

Two of the instincts are to exalt our species and exalt ourselves as we interact with others in in the various aggregations we belong to. Because we are so important and special to ourselves, it is normal to expect that others view us in a similar light.

The idea that an elected representative will have our interests at heart and work in our behalf seems perfectly reasonable. Out of that is derived the imaginary incentive to serve. Such an incentive exist nowhere in humanity or in any other species. It doesn’t work that way. Elected representatives see voters as their resource and out of self interest use the office to further their personal agendas.

Everyone in the world seems shocked that governments around the world are ignoring the people they have been elected to serve. I am not surprised in the slightest. I would be totally confounded if it was the other way around. Nature provides only one incentive, self interest. When representatives end up serving corporations and billionaires while actually taking from their constituents that is normal behavior.

Mainstream economists pack the imaginary incentive to serve into their models. That and many other reasons are why their models have no utility to society. Do not expect representation in government unless you force the issue.

Since I don’t engage in fantasy and honor no euphemisms, I can answer questions that no other economist can just by looking out my window.

About Fantasy Free Economics

James Quillian is an independent scholar and economist.
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